The story behind why The Boy and The Heron had near zero marketing prior to its release in Japan

The story behind why The Boy and The Heron had near zero marketing prior to its release in Japan

Studio Ghibli’s latest film, The Boy and The Heron had near zero marketing before its release in Japan. This was a deliberate decision by the studio’s producer, Toshio Suzuki, who wanted to create a sense of mystery and excitement around the film.

In an interview, Suzuki explained that he wanted to recapture the feeling of excitement that he experienced as a child when he would go to the cinema to watch a movie without knowing anything about it. He said that nowadays, we have too much information about films before we see them, which can ruin the surprise.

By keeping The Boy and the Heron a secret, Suzuki wanted to create a more immersive and emotional experience for the audience. He said that he wanted people to watch the film with “fresh eyes and hearts,” without any preconceived notions.

The Scarcity Principle of Marketing

The scarcity principle of marketing is a psychological phenomenon in which people tend to value things more when they are scarce or difficult to obtain. This principle can generate excitement and demand for a product or service.

In the case of The Boy and the Heron, the lack of marketing created a sense of scarcity and exclusivity. People were eager to see the film because it was so mysterious. There were no trailers, no screenshots, and not even any character art. The only marketing material was a single poster. This also led to the speculation that this might be Miyazaki’s last film.

This scarcity of information made people even more curious about the film. They wanted to know what it was about, who was in it, and how it looked. This curiosity led to a lot of word-of-mouth buzz, which helped to generate even more excitement and demand.

The Boy and The Heron had Near Zero Marketing: A Successful Strategy

The story behind why The Boy and The Heron had near zero marketing prior to its release in Japan
The Boy and The Heron | Image courtesy of Studio Ghibli

Suzuki’s gamble paid off. The Boy and the Heron opened to a strong box office in Japan, despite the lack of marketing. It also received positive reviews from critics and audiences alike. Studio Ghibli’s marketing tactic for The Boy and the Heron is a refreshing contrast to the relentless advertising and over-marketing that is so common in Hollywood today. It shows that there is a better way to market films and that audiences are willing to respond to a more subtle and nuanced approach.

The success of The Boy and the Heron shows that it is possible to have a successful film without spending a lot of money on marketing. By creating a sense of mystery and exclusivity, Studio Ghibli generated excitement and demand for the film.

Conclusion

The story behind why The Boy and The Heron had near zero marketing prior to its release in Japan
The Boy and The Heron | Image courtesy of Studio Ghibli

The Boy and the Heron is a unique example of a film that was released with near zero marketing. This strategy successfully generated excitement and demand for the film, and it shows that it is possible to have a successful film without spending millions

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