What is Ghosting in Anime?

What is Ghosting in Anime?

Before you start to wonder, no, we are not talking about ghosts in anime or ghosting someone. So, what is ghosting in anime? Ghosting is a visual effect that can occur in anime, as well as other types of video, due to a variety of factors. It is characterized by the appearance of after-images or trails behind moving objects. While ghosting can sometimes be undesirable, it can also be used intentionally to create certain aesthetic effects.

What is ghosting in anime used to accomplish?

One common cause of ghosting in anime is the use of low frame rates. Anime is typically animated at 24 frames per second (fps), which is lower than the standard frame rate for live-action video (25 fps or 30 fps). This can lead to ghosting, especially when objects are moving quickly.

Another cause of ghosting in anime is the use of frame interpolation. Frame interpolation is a technique that uses software to create new frames of animation between existing frames. This can make the animation look smoother and more fluid, but it can also introduce ghosting, especially if the frame interpolation is not done properly.

Ghosting can also be caused by certain types of video compression. When video is compressed, some information is lost, which can lead to artifacts such as ghosting.

Intentional Ghosting, Just not the Dating Kind

In anime, ghosting is often used intentionally to create certain visual effects. For example, ghosting can be used to make movement look more fluid and dynamic. It can also be used to create a sense of speed or urgency. Ghosting can also be used to create a more atmospheric or dreamlike effect.

One example of ghosting being used intentionally in anime is in the fight scene between Momoshiki and Boruto in Boruto: Naruto Next Generations episode 65. During the fight, Momoshiki uses a jutsu that causes a swarm of ninja tools to fly toward Boruto. The ninja tools move so quickly that they create a ghost-like trail behind them. This effect helps to emphasize the speed and power of Momoshiki’s jutsu.

Another example of ghosting being used intentionally in anime is in the anime series Attack on Titan. The series often uses a technique called sakuga, which is a type of animation that is characterized by its fluid motion and dynamic camerawork. Sakuga can sometimes produce ghosting, but this is often done intentionally to create a more impactful visual effect.

Dimming- the step-brother of Ghosting

One similarity between ghosting and dimming is that they can both be used to create a more atmospheric or dramatic effect. Dimming in anime is the technique of reducing the overall brightness of the image. Dimming is often used in anime during scenes that involve bright flashes of light, such as explosions or lightning strikes.

This is done to reduce the risk of seizures in viewers who are photosensitive. Dimming can also be used to create a more atmospheric or dramatic effect, such as to make a scene seem more ominous or suspenseful. For example, many anime series will dim the screen during scenes of combat or when a character is in danger.

What is Ghosting in Anime?
Asuka VS Mass Production Eva Series | Image courtesy of Gainax Studio

In the anime series Neon Genesis Evangelion, the screen is often dimmed during scenes of combat or when the characters are in danger. This helps to create a more suspenseful and dramatic atmosphere.

Conclusion

What is Ghosting in Anime?
Asuka VS Mass Production Eva Series | Image courtesy of Gainax Studio

Overall, ghosting is a complex visual effect that can be caused by a variety of factors. While ghosting can sometimes be undesirable, it can also be used intentionally to create certain aesthetic effects. Anime animators often use ghosting to make the movement look more fluid, dynamic, and impactful.

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